2019 Couch Center Awards Announced


Hart Winner of 2019 Gronbeck Political Communication Research Award

Carl Couch Center for Social and Internet Research (www.cccsir.com) is pleased to announce the co-winners of 2019 Bruce E. Gronbeck Political Communication Research Award.

Roderick Hart (University of Texas, Austin) won the 2019 Gronbeck Award with his work, Civic Hope: How Ordinary Americans Keep Democracy Alive. In this work, Hart presents a history of what everyday Americans say – in their own words – about the government overseeing their lives. Based on an analysis of 10,000 letters to the editor from 1948 to the present published in twelve U.S. cities, Hart shows why the nation still thrives. Hart maintains that the vitality of a democracy lies not in its strengths but in its weaknesses and in the willingness of its people to address those weaknesses with surcease. Hart argues that the key is to sustain a culture of argument at the grassroots level.

Carl Couch Center wishes to thank members of the Gronbeck Award Review Committee in reviewing applications: Robert Hariman (Northwestern University), David Henry (UNLV), Thomas Hollihan (University of Southern California), and Judith Trent (University of Cincinnati).

Gronbeck Award is an annual competition established by the Carl Couch Center to recognize outstanding published works that interpret or address theoretical-conceptual, historical, and critical-cultural issues of political communication. Submissions are evaluated based on the quality of (1) originality, (2) organization, (3) presentation, and (4) advancement of knowledge. For more information about Gronbeck Award please contact Shing-Ling Sarina Chen at sarina.chen@uni.edu, or visit the Couch Center website at www.cccsir.com.


Guarneri Won 2019 Carey Media Research Award

Carl Couch Center for Social and Internet Research (www.cccsir.com) is pleased to announce the winner of 2019 James W. Carey Media Research Award.

Julia Guarneri (University of Cambridge) won the 2019 Carey Award with her work, *Newsprint Metropolis: City Papers and the Making of Modern Americans*. In this book, Guarneri uses New York, Philadelphia, Milwaukee, and Chicago as case studies to demonstrate how city papers became active agents in creating metropolitan spaces and distinctive urban culture. Guarneri illustrates the linked histories of newspapers and the cities they served.

Carl Couch Center wishes to thank the hard work of members of the Carey Award Review Committee: Dr. Matt Carlson (University of Minnesota), Dr. Kathy Roberts Forde (University of Massachusetts), and Dr. Linda Steiner (University of Maryland).

Carey Award is an annual competition established by the Couch Center to recognize outstanding works on topics that were central to Carey's scholarship. Submissions focus on technology, time & space and communication, the nature ofpublic life, the relation between journalism and popular culture – among others – taking these themes in new or
different directions. Applicationsare evaluated based on engagement with Carey's approaches and concepts, originality, and advancement of knowledge.

For more information about Carey Award please contact Shing-Ling Sarina Chen at sarina.chen@uni.edu, or visit the Couch Center website at www.cccsir.com.


Howe and Bisel Won 2019 Saxton Applied Research Award

Carl Couch Center for Social and Internet Research (www.cccsir.com) is proud to announce the winners of 2019 Stanley L. Saxton Applied Research Award.

William Howe, Jr. and Ryan Bisel (University of Oklahoma) won the award with their work, “Storytelling of Organizational Entry on Virtual Spaces: The Memorable Messages of “Awesome [Stuff] My Drill Sergeant Said.”

In this work, Howe and Bisel argue that potential organizational members are increasingly consuming socialization stories via virtual spaces. They indicate that virtual spaces represent a new and potent means by which members share memorable messages from their organizational experiences. They analyze storytelling about memorable socialization messages regarding basic training posted to a military-themed website. 200 stories were randomly selected for analysis. These stories were first evaluated inductively for common themes and then coded, based on military portrayal, and associated with viewer ratings. Statistical analysis revealed that viewers rated positive military portrayals more favorably than negative portrayals. Implications for military socialization, virtual spaces, and totalistic organizations conclude the essay.

Carl Couch Center wishes to thank the Review Committee members for their hard work to make this award possible, and they are: Steven Buban (Monmouth College), Michael Katovich (Texas Christian University) and Joel Powell Dahlquist (Minnesota State University, Moorhead).

Saxton Award is an annual competition, open to both students and the faculty who submit papers that focus on how theory, research, and/or practice contribute to addressing real, pragmatic, social problems. Papers may be theoretical, methodological, or empirical in nature. For more information about Saxton Award, please contact Shing-Ling Sarina Chen at sarina.chen@uni.edu, or visit the Couch Center website at www.cccsir.com.


Kenney and Akita Won 2019 Christians Ethics Research Award

Carl Couch Center for Social and Internet Research (www.cccsir.com) is pleased to announce the winners of 2019 Clifford G. Christians Ethics Research Award. Rick Kenney (Augusta University) and Kimiko Akita (Aichi Prefectural University, Nagakute, Japan) won the 2019 Christians Award with their work, “Made in Japan: Connecting the Dots through Contemporary Communitarianism’s Intellectual History.” In this work, Kenney and Akita evaluate communitarianism as a media ethic, and extend the communitarian ideal by connecting it to notions constructed by a Japanese philosopher,Tetsuro Watsuji, .

Carl Couch Center wishes to thank members of the Christians Award Review Committee: Ronald Arnett (Duquesne University), Deni Elliott (University of South Florida, St. Petersburg), Robert Fortner (Calvin College), Melba Velez Ortiz (Grand Valley State University), and Lee Wilkins (University of Missouri).

Christians Award is an annual competition established by the Couch Center to recognize outstanding ethics research that interpret or address important theoretical issues in the areas of ethics, mass communication theory, and the relationship between media and technology and culture, interpret and apply concepts employed in Christians' work in new and insightful ways. Submissions are evaluated based on the quality of (1) mastery of Christians’ approaches and concepts, (2) originality, (3) organization, (4) presentation, and (5) advancement of knowledge.

For more information about Christians Award please contact Shing-Ling Chen at sarina.chen@uni.edu, or visit the Couch Center website at www.cccsir.com.


Schrock, McCabe and Vaccaro Won 2019 Maines Narrative Research Award

The Carl Couch Center for Social and Internet Research (www.cccsir.com) is pleased to announce the winner of 2019 David R. Maines Narrative Research Award.

Douglas Schrock (Florida State University), Janice McCabe (Dartmouth College), and Christian Vaccaro (Indiana University of Pennsylvania) won the 2019 Maines Award for their work, “Narrative Manhood Acts: BattererIntervention Program Graduates’ TragicRelationships.” In this article, the authors analyze how twenty graduates of a Batterer Intervention Program constructed autobiographical stories about their relationships with women they assaulted. They focus on the presentation of gendered selves via narrative manhood acts, which they define as self-narratives that signify membership in the category “man” and the possession of a masculine self. Their study demonstrates the usefulness of narrative analysis for research on batterers’ accounts and manhood acts, and also shows how oppositional genre-making can be a method to resist organizational narratives.

Couch Center wishes to thank the hard work of the Maines Award Review Committee members to make the award evaluation posssible—Elaine Jenks (West Chester University), William Rawlins (Ohio University), Jim Thomas (Northern Illinois University) and Jeff Ulmer (Pennsylvania State University).

The Maines Award is an annual competition, open to both students and the faculty who submit papers that (1) interpret or address Maines’ pragmatist approaches, (2) apply Maines’ narrative concepts to a social/communication event, (3) develop aspects of Maines’ scholarship in new directions, or (4) integrate the humanistic development of narrative and Maines' pragmatist conceptual and theoretical direction. For more information about Maines Award, please visit the Couch Center website at www.cccsir.com, or contact Shing-Ling Sarina Chen at sarina.chen@uni.edu.


Burkhard Won 2019 Norman K. Denzin Award

Carl Couch Center for Social and Internet Research (www.cccsir.com) is pleased to announce the winner of 2019 Norman K. Denzin Qualitative Research Award.

Tanja Burkhard (University of Pittsburgh) won the 2019 Denzin Award with “A New Spelling of My Name”: Becoming a (Black, feminist, immigrant) Autoethnographer through Zami. In this article, Burkhard provides the historical context for the reception of Audre Lorde’s biomythography Zami’s by Black women across the African diaspora as a backdrop for an autoethnographic engagement of the book.

Carl Couch Center wishes to thank members of Denzin Award Review Committee: Bryant Alexander (Loyola Marymount University), Bob Rinehart (The University of Waikato, New Zealand), Stacy Holman Jones (Monash University, Australia), Marcelo Diversi (Washington State University, Vancouver).

Denzin Award is an annual competition established by the Couch Center to recognize outstanding works that (1) interpret or address Denzin’s theoretical or interpretive approaches, (2) demonstrate creative narrative ethnographies/autoethnographies as advocated by Denzin, (3) apply Denzinian concepts to a communication event, be it social or mediated, etc., (4) synthesize Denzinian ideas with other lines of scholarship, or (5) develop aspects of Dezinian scholarship in new directions, to be considered for Denzin Award.

For more information about Denzin Award please contact Shing-Ling Chen at sarina.chen@uni.edu, or visit the Couch Center website at www.cccsir.com.


Geiss Won 2019 Couch Internet Research Award

The Carl Couch Center for Social and Internet Research (www.cccsir.com) is pleased to announce the winner of 2019 Carl J. Couch Internet Research Award.

Carley Geiss (University of South Florida) won the 2019 Couch Award for her work, “Exploring Cultural Conventions of Compassionate Healthcare through Virtual Narrative Ethnography.” In this study, Geiss illustrates how public organizational narratives about compassionate healthcare reflect and reinforce cultural systems of meaning. Using virtual narrative ethnography of Schwartz Center of Compassionate Healthcare, Geiss demonstrates the construction of a formula story that operates through (1) characterization of the “compassionate-worthy patient,” (2) a plot of empathetic connection and compassionate action between patients and providers, and (3) morals that communicate personal, clinical, and institutional benefits of compassion in healthcare.

Couch Award is an annual competition, open to students who submit papers that (1) use a symbolic interactionist approach inInternet studies, (2) explore the interfacebetween deliberate social interaction and structured (or automated)interactions sponsored or enacted by various technological features, and(3) examine not only how identities, relations, and social formations arenegotiated through social interactions, but also how these interactions aremediated further through the use or capacities of various technologies.

For more information about Couch Award, please visit the Couch Center website at www.cccsir.com, or contact Shing-Ling Sarina Chen at sarina.chen@uni.edu.

 

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